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Is Your Safety Data Really Helping?

Is Your Safety Data Really Helping?

Like it or lukewarm about it, data is part of the way business is done nowadays. It provides tools unlike any we have seen before, and offers us opportunities to make not only work but our lives better too. But for those of you still on the fence, data can be simply too much. Too many variables. Too much information. Too much of what you don’t need.

The benefits of data—to leadership, decision making, and safety—can get lost in the deluge of facts and figures, with even the most curated data often going to the wrong people or the wrong level of the organization. What’s needed is a way to know where the data should go to optimize its value. Who should get this chart as opposed to that report? How comprehensive should the data be for people on the factory floor as opposed to the boardroom?

Without the information they need, how can leaders steer the business in the right direction? How will frontline employees know where to focus their efforts? The point is to get the right data to the right people, so everyone can do their jobs as efficiently and effectively as possible.

To help achieve this end (and hopefully get some of you off the fence and on board with the joys of data), we offer this guide to safety data reporting by organizational level. Treat it as a starting point, with the option of digging into detail to answer specific questions.

Executive leadership

  • Statistical control charts of injury trends organization wide.
  • Variation of safety performance across business units and a focus on statistically significant variation.
  • Statistical control charts of serious injury and fatality potential rates by business unit.
  • The status of high-profile safety initiatives and activities (e.g., focused on catastrophic event prevention, culture change or safety leadership development or significant changes to the safety and health management system).
  • Organization level opportunities for improvement that come from the interpretation of the data and that require their knowledge and support.

Business unit leadership

  • Statistical control charts of injury trends for the business unit.
  • Variation of safety performance across locations within the business unit with a focus on statistically significant variation.
  • Statistical control charts of serious injury and fatality potential rates by location.
  • The status of high-profile safety initiatives and activities.
  • Business unit level opportunities that come from the interpretation of the data.

Location-level leadership

  • Statistical control charts of injury trends for the location.
  • Variation of safety performance across departments, with a focus on statistically significant variation.
  • Statistical control charts of serious injury and fatality potential rates.
  • Location-level opportunities for improvement that come from the interpretation of the data.
  • The status of high-profile safety initiatives and activities.

Frontline employees

  • Reporting of raw numbers of injury events versus prior periods.
  • The status of high-profile safety initiatives and activities.
  • Location-level opportunities for improvement that come from the interpretation of the data.

Getting people the information they need can be difficult, especially when you don’t have the right safety data management system to do the heavy lifting. Let us show you how our Insight Via Safety Management System can help you streamline your information process and deliver the data you need to make decisions that truly advance safety.

You can also take a look at our safety data checklist to see if your current system is providing everything you need to manage safety easily and effectively.

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Friday, 25 September 2020